Category Archives: Bath Pubs

Chapter 1 – Community Pub

In all the stories of doom and gloom, with pub closures a running theme, it’s always good to relate a success story. Emma and Mike at Chapter 1 have taken a pub that looked as though it was dying and turned it into a community asset.

Readers of this blog will know that Chapter 1 has almost become our local – although it’s the other side of the River Avon, a quick jaunt down to the canal, over Folly Footbridge, under the GWR and over the Avon then through Kensington Meadows and we’re there. It’s become such an institution with the London Road crowd that it seems hardly possible it’s only been there a year. The weekend of 20th May incredibly saw the first birthday of the pub in its new guise.

Enjoying the incredible cheese birthday cake were, among other guests, Chris Scullion of Independent Spirit and Harry Speller of Albion Brewing Company, not to mention regular visitor Bertie the Cockapoo. Among the beers was the innovative Cream Soda from another small brewery, Hubris Id, whose beers can often be found on the list.

Chris Scullion of Independent Spirit checks out local brews.
Chris Scullion of Independent Spirit checks out local brews.
Harry Speller and other customers enjoy the cheese birthday cake.
Harry Speller and other customers enjoy the cheese birthday cake.
Bertie waits patiently for a treat - this is very definitely a dog-friendly pub.
Bertie waits patiently for a treat – this is very definitely a dog-friendly pub.

The owners Mike and Emma also got into the spirit of the election, offering a free beer to newly registered voters. Local issues were also discussed at Campfire Conversations, on May 28th. Organised by Pete Lawrence, it’s a new initiative being held at places like Hay on Wye, Lewes, Brighton, Malvern and Frome. Among the speakers were Erica Seo from Vegmead, Emma Adams from Meadows Alliance and Luke Emmett from Theatre Bus. The Green candidate Eleanor Field and the Labour candidate Joe Rayment also dropped by. As might be expected, the discussion got a bit heated at times, but Pete Lawrence was a firm chairman, and it all ended amicably.

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Erica Seo animatedly tells the listeners more about how Vegmead is progressing.

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It’s not all political discussion (although Johnny Clayton of Hubris Id wittily brewed Covfefe, an APA, at the end of May). Throughout the summer there will be a rare chance to see the paintings and prints by PHIL KELLY 1950-2010, in an exhibition called From The London Road to Mexico and back.
Phil lived in Bath in the early 1970s, in a flat just up the street from The Britannia – now Chapter One.
He moved to Mexico in 1980 and was a very successful, exhibiting at The Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City and in many prestigious galleries. His work is a distinctive feature in Rick Stein’s Seafood Cafe in Padstow and his paintings are in many significant private collections.

The Spanish conversation group Todo el Mundo has already held one event there, and look to be planning more, while from time to time, local bands can be found playing there. There are plenty of other drinks from choose from if you’re not keen on beer – they have been known to turn their hands to cocktails.

What you won’t find are tv screens but you will find board games and newspapers. Emma and Mike are collecting some rave reviews from visitors and many local people are now dropping in. Chapter 1 is turning into a real hub for the rather diverse community on the London Road – and that’s what pubs should be all about!

Popping up at the Packhorse

Work and play at the PackhorseIMG_8254The controversy about the dropping of the word Easter from Cadbury’s Egg hunts, despite being exposed as fake news, also showed that Easter is a very ancient tradition which, wherever and in whatever religion it is celebrated, marks a new beginning, a rebirth. So it was very appropriate that it was on Easter Sunday that a pop-up bar opened at the Packhorse at South Stoke to mark the new beginnings of the pub. This is not the first such event, but it’s clear that visible work is now progressing to bring back this pub to its former glory as the centre of the community.

Not all the work involves actual hard graft – besides the craftsmen busy at work with their tools, there is also research work in progress. The secrets the building is giving up as inappropriate alterations are removed are revealing a surprising history. For instance, there’s the splendid fireplace exposed on the ground floor in the south room, now carefully restored and repaired by Nigel Bryant (Master Mason and Conservator) and his talented wife, Becky.

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The newly revealed fire surround – now throughly repaired and restored.

The fire surround is certainly seventeenth century and may be older. Dendrochronology has revealed that some of the floorboards are older than the building was initially believed to be. Floorboards and fireplaces could, of course, be recycled – building materials often were because they were expensive while labour was cheap – but there is a real sense of excitement among historians that the building has a longer history than was first believed. So some of the Packhorse team have been delving into the archives and have come up with a new theory. They are asking themselves if it was built as a church house. It is, at present, just a theory but it would increase the importance of the Packhorse both to Somerset historians and to the community. Although there are a lot of church houses in Devon they are much rarer in Somerset, so this would be an exciting discovery if true.

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Discussing history at the information desk.

However, history was not on the mind of the many people who turned up to enjoy the chance to have a drink at the Packhorse as they had done in the past. Honey’s cider was one of the tipples on offer, as was Abbey Ales’ Bellringer, but in good old Somerset pub tradition, there was also some cider made from local apples, pressed at the open day at the pub last October. It was, as I was warned, mouth-tinglingly dry, but once I’d recovered from the initial shock, I could see how a good cider could have replaced white wine. It is known that, after the restoration of Charles II, cider moved considerably up-market, competing with fine wines from the mainland of Europe.  The king himself enjoyed drinking it and the price went through the roof.

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Chatting about cider at the bar.

There was plenty going on during the day. There was an Easter egg hunt for children, music, a plant stall and a busy cake stall. Given the number of four-legged visitors, it seems clear the pub will have to be dog-friendly. It is certainly on Islay’s list. If the pub can attract this number of visitors by word of mouth and social media for a one-off event, without being able to offer cooked food (beyond homemade cakes baked by local people) it shows how well it could do when it is established.

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It was busy in the garden ….
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… and it was very busy at the bar!

Events like this are a rebuke to the naysayers who said it closed because it wasn’t supported. This is a building which has been at the heart of the community for centuries, perhaps even more so than was earlier suspected. It was heartening to see it so busy.

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A pub is a place for all generations to get together.
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Even though it’s a building site at present, Islay the Westie gives the Packhorse her seal of approval.

I hope to return at a later date to investigate the historic features which aren’t, at present, on show to the public – I will put up photos when I’ve been.

Good News and Bad.

Over the Easter weekend we received some good news – an application to convert the Red Lion at Ampney St Peter to housing was turned down. This pub was a real gem, with just two rooms as the pub and no bar counter, but perfectly served beer. It was a Mecca for pub and beer enthusiasts but the death of the landlord had seen it close. Now it looks as though the present owner will have to rethink her refusal to accept offers to run it as a pub.

Sadly, however, while chatting in the garden at the Packhorse, we received the unwelcome but not unexpected news that Tucker’s Grave is on the market. Watch this space for more news.

 

Forty Years On

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In 1976, the slim booklet seen above made its appearance. Its author, Fred Pearce, who appears on the cover, described it as ‘a guide for those adventurous citizens looking for variety in their drinking habits’, and he did not pull any punches. If he thought a pub was great he said so, and if he thought a pub was rubbish he said so too, presumably on the basis that he wouldn’t be making a return trip to discover the landlord’s reaction to his comments.

Forty years on, it makes entertaining reading. He rated pubs on a star system – 4 stars for a great pub, 1 star for a rubbish one. Among those awarded a single star were the Kings Arms in Monmouth Place, memorable solely for ‘that peculiar pub aroma of loo disinfectant’.

The Oliver - 'a particularly nasty Berni lounge'
The Oliver – ‘a particularly nasty Berni lounge’

Other 1star pubs included the Oliver in Green Street – a ‘particularly nasty Berni lounge’; the Roundhouse in Stall Street (now Pret a Manger), another ‘nasty pub’ with a ‘small selection of expensive lunchtime food served in cardboard plates’; and the Chequers on Rivers Street, guilty of ‘ridiculously inflated beer prices’. And what were these inflated prices, you might ask? Ushers Best at 27p, Watneys Pale at 25p and Worthington E at 30p – ‘for no apparent reason other than profiteering’ according to Fred.

The Roundhouse - another 'nasty pub'
The Roundhouse – another ‘nasty pub’

Although these prices may seem extraordinary today, what is more remarkable is how little choice there was. Fred Pearce was a wholehearted supporter of the fledgling real ale movement, and his booklet was largely aimed at discerning real ale drinkers. So what did they have to choose from?

Of 44 Watneys’ pubs surveyed, only 15 served real ale, mostly Ushers Pale, although a few also served ‘the locally popular Worthington E’. Of the 78 Courage’s pub surveyed – almost half the total – only 37 served real ale, mostly Courage Ordinary, as well as Courage Best and Worthington E. Seven pubs were owned by Wadworths, while Whitbread, Bass Charrington and Allied Breweries each owned a handful of pubs between them. There were also 18 free houses, plus ‘a rare example of Devenish beer (brewed in Weymouth) served on a handpump at the Coeur de Lion’ and Eldridge Pope’s ‘new and excellent Royal Oak’ available at the brewery’s only Bath pub, the Huntsman. One of the highlights of the real ale scene in the city was ‘the availability of the highly regarded Marston’s Pedigree Bitter all the way from Burton on Trent’ at ‘two central Bath outlets’.

Fred's photos of drinkers in the Volly
Fred’s photos of drinkers in the Volly

Many drinkers, myself included, will remember what drinking in the 1970s was like, but it still comes as something of a shock to be reminded just how little choice there was. One of Fred Pearce’s favourite Bath pubs was Broadley’s in the Sawclose (now Gascoyne Place), which he described as ‘a real ale drinker’s paradise. And what was on offer? ‘Marston’s Pedigree Bitter from the wood at 23p a pint, Mitchells & Butlers and E on handpump, plus Brew XI, Tartan, Trophy, Tankard and bottled White Shield’.

Another 4-star pub was the Coeur de Lion, on the strength of its Devenish Bitter and IPA. The Huntsman also scored 4 points, largely because of its premium bitter, Royal Oak, which Fred described as ‘a very strong pint served direct from the barrel (28p in the public, 30p in the other bars)’. ‘Very strong’ actually equated to 5%, and in 1976 it was very much the exception; today, the chances are that you will find produce at least one beer stronger than 5% – sometimes much stronger – in all of the city’s top real or craft ale pubs.

There was also a new pub on St James Parade in 1976 – long since closed – called the Heath Robinson. This, according to Fred, was a ‘brand new real ale bar set up to take advantage of the boom’. Presumably at the cutting edge of the real ale scene, it served Wadworth’s 6X, Worthington E and South Wales Club Best Bitter, all at 26p, and Wadworth’s Old Timer (which weighed in at a hefty 5.8%) in winter at 30p.

The Old Green Tree, where Ushers PA and xx were available
The Old Green Tree, where Ushers Pale and Worthington E were available
The Hat & Feather, awarded 4 stars despite the presence of nasty long haired hippies
The Hat & Feather, awarded 4 stars by Fred despite the presence of ‘nasty long-haired hippies’

Fred’s other top recommendations included the Old Green Tree (Ushers Pale and Worthington E on draught), the Midland (now the Bath Brew House) with ‘well-kept Courage Best and Ordinary on handpump’. Well-kept Courage Best and Ordinary could also be found in the Volunteer Rifleman’s Arms, the Saracen’s Head, and the late-lamented Hat & Feather (which Fred awarded 4 stars despite describing it as ‘tatty’ and filled with ‘nasty long-haired hippies’!). He was also keen on the Star, and his description of it is worth quoting in full:

When the lights are off inside you’d be forgiven for passing the Star by thinking it long abandoned. But thankfully it lives on. Entirely panelled in wood the 3 small old bars (including one called the Glass Room) have a unique atmosphere. Real Bass and E are served direct from the barrel – the array of six handpumps that occupy the entire length of the main bar are disused. There’s no music or games but beer for CAMRA men to rave over, a thigh-high communal trough in the men’s loo, old Punch-type cartoons in the Glass Room and some photos of the pub’s exterior in the heady days of 1917 and a ‘Guinness Time’ clock in the main bar. A star pub indeed.

The Star - an unchanged classic, but with its long tradition of Bass from the barrel in abeyance, at least for the moment
The Star – an unchanged classic, but with its long tradition of Bass from the barrel in abeyance, at least for the moment

Although the handpumps at the Star have long been reinstated, the tradition of serving Bass straight from the barrel was kept up until a few weeks ago. It has now sadly been discontinued due to a decision by InBev (who now brew Bass) to stop supplying it in kilderkins but instead to use 10 gallon barrels, which are incompatible with the Star’s racking system (see previous post). Elsewhere the availability of Marston’s Pedigree served from the wood is but a distant memory. But, while the range of beers on offer in many of Bath’s pubs is as predictable as it was 40 years ago – even though the brews may be different from those back then – in the city’s top real ale and craft beer pubs, the choice – and the rapidity with which guest beers succeed each other – is one that would have seemed unimaginable in 1976. Whether Fred would have approved or not is another matter.

 

The end of a great tradition.

img_4847One of the great traditions of the Star on the Paragon in Bath is no more – thanks to a high-handed and abrupt decision by ABInBev, the brewers of Bass. For many years now, it has been the habit to bring Bass up from the cellar on a lift which raises the kilderkins – 18 gallons – to the bar area. Ask for Bass, and the bar staff will tap off the beer into a jug, ready to pour it into your glass. So popular is this that Paul Waters, the landlord, was a regular purchaser of kilderkins. It has to be admitted that this was slightly unusual – many pubs simply do not get through the same quantities of beer which means the beer would go off before they could sell it all. But this did not apply at the Star.

When he bought his most recent consignment, there was no indication of any trouble. So Paul had no inkling, when he received a phone call from InBev, of the bad news he was about to receive. ‘Make the most of those barrels,’ the spokesperson said ‘That’s the last you’re getting. We’re not going to do 18s any longer.  We’re reducing them to 10s.’

Paul Waters is usually happy serving beer - but here he sadly fills a jug from the barrel for almost the last time.
Paul Waters is usually happy serving beer – but here he sadly fills a jug from the barrel for almost the last time.

There’s a lot that’s wrong with that decision. Firstly, as a matter of courtesy, those landlords, like Paul, who were buying them should have had longer notice. Secondly, for busy pubs, 18s are more efficient. And finally, 10s are not a usual European size. It’s American.

Anheuser, the A part of AB InBev is an American company. Although they claim to be proud of their European heritage and of being a global brewery, it is a very big player in the USA. So despite all their claims of respecting heritage it is only their American heritage the company seems interested in. The grand old English measure of a kilderkin will be swept away. And if they are going to use 10s, one can guess that it won’t be long before the firkin – or 9 – will also go. Is this, perhaps, a result of Brexit? Are AB-InBev  getting ready to pull out supplying the UK market? It looks ominously like it. British pubs are geared up to the old sizes. A change like this will have far-reaching implications for many. The Bell in Walcot Street, Bath, for instance, has racks in its cellar designed specifically to take 9s.

For Paul Waters, it means some rapid rethinking. For the present, Bass will now take up one of the valuable hand pumps – the cradles are too big to take 10s. So that means one less guest ale. On busy evenings, such as after a Bath Rugby home match, you may find yourself waiting while Paul has to change the barrel.

Regulars at the Star, who have availed themselves of its tradtional approach for many years, are unhappy at the decision.
Regulars at the Star, who have availed themselves of its traditional approach for many years, are unhappy at the decision.

Like Paul, most regulars at the Star thinks it’s a ridiculous and ill-conceived plan by AB-InBev, forcing changes on the Star without even the courtesy of an apology.  AB-InBev should at least let the drinkers of Britain – who, despite qualms about changes in the company, have gone on drinking Bass with its historic trademark and putting money in the company’s pocket – just what their future intentions are. So come on, AB-InBev  – just what game are you playing?

I should add that the good news for regulars is that Abbey Ales’ Bellringer is still very much available!

 

 

A Bright New Chapter for the old Piccadilly Alehouse

The London Road in Bath has lost more than its fair share of pubs over the last decade. Some of them, to be fair, seemed well past their sell-by date. Having said that, even pubs that seems to have reached the point of no return can still make a spectacular comeback. Take the King William at the bottom of Thomas Street, for instance – the first pub on the London Road you come to as you head out of town. Opened as a beerhouse in the 1830s, this was the sort of tiny street-corner boozer that – according to industry analysts – should have disappeared years ago, and when it closed in 2002 few people thought it would ever reopen. It was an archetypal local’s pubs, with card players, a thick fug of tobacco smoke and curtains drawn against the outside world even on the sunniest day.

But instead of being snapped up by a developer and converted to flats, it was acquired by Charlie and Amanda Digney who cleaned it up, preserving as many of the original features as they could, and reopened it as a combination of local boozer and gastropub that hit the mark from day one – and continues to do so well over a decade later. Superb food, superb beer, and a place where a loyal band of regulars are joined by a constant stream of newcomers who almost invariably vow to return. It’s got no parking, still has its old two-room layout, and is well out of the city centre – yet with all that it is one of the most inspiring  success stories of the Bath pub trade in the 21st century.

Carry on along the London Road, though, and the story is less cheerful. A little further on was the Long Acre Tavern, a 1960s rebuild of another nineteenth-century pub which now houses Domino’s Pizzas. Across the road was the Porter Butt, which had a hall at the back – known as the Walcot Palais – which was one of the best small music venues in the city. It was – or at any rate had been – a very well-appointed pub, some 200 years old, but with lots of fittings dating from an extensive refit in the 1920s or 1930s, and was crying out for some serious investment to realise its potential. In this case, unfortunately, however, its decline led to its conversion to a branch of Richer Sounds.

And so we come to what was the Piccadilly Ale House on the corner of Hanover Street. Built around 1805, this was originally an upmarket hostelry called the Britannia. Masonic lodges and the local militia held their meetings here, and it was a focal point for local political groups. In the mid-twentieth century it was renamed the Piccadilly after the terrace it stood in, but, as the world moved on, it stayed just as it was – which would have been OK, if there had been sufficient investment to keep it up to scratch. But there wasn’t, and its slow spiral of decline ended with closure, followed by a short-lived reopening as the Hive – part family-friendly cafe, part music venue, part-pub. When that closed and the building was placed, on the market its conversion to flats, offices or a retail unit seemed unavoidable.

Step forward Michael and Emma Heap, with a new spin on what a pub should be, and the determination to make it work. In the case of the Piccadilly, that meant an enormous amount of hard graft, reversing the effect of years of neglect and creating a venue that looked to the future with confidence rather than muddling along in a time-worn timewarp. Dingy old fittings and decades of encrustation were stripped away – to reveal a light and airy space which, while harking back to its origins as a Georgian tavern, could accommodate the cutting edge of interior design.

Michael and Emma behind the bar at Chapter One
Michael and Emma behind the bar of Chapter One

After months of hard graft, Chapter One finally opened its doors in May this year, a new and very welcome addition to Bath’s pub scene. The emphasis is very much on beer, with up to five craft ales on tap at any one time. Cask ales are not offer at the moment, because of the logistics of serving them in a pub which is currently only open four days a week. Plans are in hand, however, to open on other days, and lines for cask ale (the pipes that will bring it up from the cellar) have already been installed. So, as soon as opening hours are extended, pumps will appear on the bar and cask ale will flow.

Michael and Emma are passionate about beer, and eager to introduce locals to as many small independent brewers as possible. So far, the list has included Kernel, Cloudwater, Ilkley, Siren, 5 Points, Arbor, Burning Sky, Bristol Beer Factory, Wylam, Beavertown, Saltaire, Wild Beer, Dark

The team from Kettlesmith Brewery at the tap takeover on 8 October
The team from Kettlesmith Brewery at the tap takeover on 8 October

Star, Wiper & True, Moor, Tiny Rebel, Thornbridge, Left Handed Giant – and many others. There have already been two tap takeovers – Good Chemistry from Bristol on 23 July and, more recently, Kettlesmith from Bradford on Avon on 8 October.

In line with their policy of supporting small independent producers, especially from the local area, Michael and Emma also serve Handmade Cider and Somerset Cider Brandy, as well as a carefully chosen range of wines and spirits. A range of Scotch eggs – made in Bath – are also available should you feel peckish.

The bar in Chapter One
The bar in Chapter One

Chapter One has already attracted a loyal band of regular customers, who come to enjoy its laid-back atmosphere, relax over a beer or two and maybe play one of the many board and card games on offer. And, although it is a fair step from the town centre, word is getting around that, for those keen on trying craft beers from an ever-changing range of cutting-edge brewers, it is well worth the effort of getting to know.

Chapter One is open from 5pm on Thursdays and Fridays, and from 2pm on Saturdays and Sundays.

... and dogs are very welcome.
… and dogs are very welcome.

 

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Did South Stoke save the Packhorse? Here’s the answer.

As writers on the subject of pubs, we so often find now that we are describing the demise of yet another well- loved watering-hole. In 2012, when Punch sold the Packhorse at South Stoke, it was, after some toing and froing, sold to a buyer who declared he intended to turn it into a private house. It seemed that an all too familiar story was about to be repeated.

Punch’s excuse was that the pub was failing. This was partly due to the fact that they had put an inexperienced person in as landlord. It’s a favourite ploy by pubcos – it helps to run the place down. It’s very sad for the landlord and also sad for the village when that happens. But to say it could never be a pub was clearly nonsense – several experienced publicans who were far from starry-eyed about the place expressed an interest and offered over the asking price.

The village was incensed and started a campaign. The first move was to have the pub declared an asset of community value. But the owner refused the offer that the community made to buy it. He then submitted a planning application. Like many others, your esteemed bloggers were aghast at the condition the building had been allowed to fall into, and wrote a fairly pungent objection. Without warning, after three months the application was withdrawn.

The owner then notified the village he intended to sell the building on. The village asked for time to raise the money to buy it. They had to raise £525,000 to buy it as well as more to refurbish it with planning consent.  The deadline was Saturday 10th September.

With a few hours to go, they were tantalisingly close. With five days to go, they had raised £498,000. Could they do it?

An excited crowd gathered at the pub on Saturday 10th to hear the announcement. This is what they were told.

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The crowd gathers for the announcement of success or failure.

 

We’re delighted to report that our share issue has been a huge success! At 7pm yesterday, after a late flood of money, over 200 investors had contributed a total of £601,000 – and there are more share applications in the pipeline. We now have the capital both to buy the Packhorse for the community and to begin to develop detailed plans for the refurbishment!

We are thrilled, relieved and hugely grateful for the generosity of supporters of the Packhorse. Thank you so much! And to the two hundred or so people who assembled in the pub garden yesterday evening to hear the news – we hope you enjoyed the occasion as much as we did.

We’re not quite there yet – we still have to raise around £265,000 for refurbishment and working capital. But the money invested so far will not only buy the pub but also buy us time to raise money for building work in early 2017 with a view to reopening early Summer next year.

They are leaving the share issue open for the time being, so there is still time for others to join this special project – just look for the prospectus and share application form on the Save the Packhorse web site.

Meanwhile, we now have time to be more creative in our fundraising. We’ll have details in due course but we expect this to involve grant applications (we have our eye on the Heritage Lottery Fund), accepting smaller donations and, among other things, events.

One such event will be an illustrated talk on “A History of Bath Pubs” by Dr Andrew Swift (yes, that’s one half of the Awash with Ale blog team) at 7:30pm on Wednesday 21st September in South Stoke Village Hall. Entrance is free but arms may be twisted for a donation to the Packhorse fund! Refreshments will be available and all are welcome. So do come along. The strange history of the Packhorse Inn is sure to feature.

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RAVEN’S BIKE-THEMED BEER FESTIVAL WELCOMES TOUR OF BRITAIN TO BATH

bikeThe Tour of Britain sweeps into Bath tomorrow (8 September), and to welcome it to town the Raven in Queen Street has not only made the natty addition to its sign seen on the left, but has organized a bike-themed beer festival. Over 30 beers are featured (12 at any one time) and, as the cycling links of some of the beers are a little obscure, there is a competition to work out what they are. Whoever gets the most right gets a prize –  whoever doesn’t gets to try some cracking beers. And there are somblackboarde rarities on offer – I was particularly pleased to discover Metal Head stout from a new Bristol Brewery called Beat Ales – one I’d not come across before, but on the strength of this, one I’ll certainly be looking out for in the future. The bikes roll into town tomorrow, the festival runs till the beers run out, but with the crowds likely to turn up tomorrow and Bath playing Newcastle at the Rec on Saturday, you’d be advised to turn up sooner rather than later

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Dugges at Hunter and Sons

For a number of reasons, this blog has been dormant for too long.

Much has happened since our last post. We have published two new pub history books, while in Bath, as elsewhere, new pubs and breweries have opened, while others have closed.

So a revival of the blog was long overdue – and there’s a lot of catching up to do. But what better way to get back into the swing of things than to feature a tap takeover at one of Bath’s top craft beer bars.

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The Brewers

On 1 September, from 6pm till late, Swedish brewers Dugges took over the taps at Hunter & Sons in Milsom Place. It was a great evening – fantastic beers, good company, with the brewers on hand to explain the thinking and the processes behind the range of brews on offer.

While Hunter & Sons are experts at showcasing an ever-changing array of beers from cutting-edge brewers around the world, a tap takeover like this gives the chance to discover and explore the work of particular brewers, and get an insight into their philosophy of and approach to brewing.

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The beers

In this country, Dugges are probably best known for their sour beers. Sour is a term that covers a wide range of beer styles, but, with their Tropic Thunder, Dugges have managed to come up with something new. The idea behind this beer was to come up with something that tasted like a popsicle – a beer, in their own words, ‘as refreshing as those ice cold, fruity treats we loved as kids.’ They have certainly succeeded – so much so that a bar back in Sweden serves this beer as a slushie for the full-on popsicle experience. Tropic Thunder, brewed with lactobacillus and fermented with mangoes, passion fruits and peaches, was joined at Hunter & Sons by Tropic Sunrise, a variation on the same theme, with raspberries added to the mix. Both beers provided an intriguing yet very satisfying combination of sweet and sour, while another sour, the laconically named Black Currant, neatly managed to avoid the syrupy overtones of Ribena that often linger around beers featuring blackcurrants.

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The T-shirt

All the other beers on offer were just as good, but for my money the two absolutely stand-out beers were High Five, a rich and complex IPA brewed with American hops, and Imperial Geisha, a fantastic Imperial Stout pepped up with Panamanian coffee, smooth, rich and sweet, with none of the heaviness or bitterness sometimes found in Imperial stouts.

If you check out the brewery at http://dugges.se/, you’ll see that their beer range is eclectic and wide-ranging, including such delights as a Raspberry Liqorice Imperial Stout, Rum Barrel Aged Barley Wines, a Berliner Weisse, a Coco Nut Imperial Stout, none of which made an appearance on the night. Dugges beers will, however, continue to appear on draught on a regular basis at Hunter & Sons, and bottles will also be available.

 

Craft Beer comes to the King William

london rd king williamAnother Bath pub joins the craft beer revolution. The King William on Thomas Street, long a standard bearer for cask beer, as well as one of the top places to eat in Bath, now has a range of three craft beers on keg. A visit today found three keg crafts on offer, including Wiper & True’s Amber, plus Wiper & True Mosaic on cask. The lunch – £15 for three courses – was superb as well, and a quick visit to the Bell in Walcot Street afterwards was rewarded with a pint of one of Bristol Beer Factory’s Independence. Would that all Monday lunchtimes could be like this – our excuse, Kirsten’s birthday.

Can it be June already?

We return after long absence, due (almost) entirely due to other commitments, such as working on a couple of books (of which more anon) and of course visits to some outstanding pubs. We also ran a one-off Georgian pub crawl in the Bath Literature Festival, starting off in authentically early Georgian setting of the cellar of the splendid Independent Spirit, and kicking off with tastings of Bliss, a traditional saison-style brew from the Wild Beer Company. Numbers were strictly limited on the Georgian Pub Crawl, so, for all those who did not get to find out how they liked to get hammered in the eighteenth century, a version of it will shortly be appearing on the blog. We have also discovered some excellent new pubs, especially in Gloucestershire, but also in Cornwall, and we have made return trips to some Somerset pub s we hadn’t visited for a long while. Needless to say, they were all dog friendly, and Islay gave them all the thumbs – or at least the paws – up.

Local news is sadly that planners gave the go ahead for the Farmhouse to be converted from a pub to a ‘health hub’ – so much for safeguarding local amenities. Two other Bath pubs have had a complete makeover and change of name. The Grappa Bar on Lansdown Road (still remembered by many as Bath’s last true cider house) has been reinvented as Comfort & Cure, featuring charcuterie, cheese and craft ale, while the Piccadilly on the London Road, unchanged since who knows when, has become the Hive, a community-based enterprise run as a cafe during the day and a bar with live music, etc, in the evening. All this is purely hearsay, as neither has yet been visited, an omission which will be put right asap. One that has been visited is the Westgate pub in Westgate Street, which since its latest makeover has around five craft beers on keg, including Brewdog Punk IPA and offerings from the likes of the Wild Beer Co, along with a good selection of cask ales and ciders.

Over in Bristol, things are finally happening at the Lamplighters, which after having got into an appalling state closing several years ago, is set to be refurbed for an opening later in the year.

The Lamplighters a few months ago ...
The Lamplighters a few months ago …
... and as it looked when it was a George's pub.
… and as it looked when it was a George’s pub.

Over in St Werburghs, meanwhile, one of Bristol’s most striking pubs, the Duke of York, has been given a facelift in the form of a new mural.

The Chelsea gets a new look
The Duke of York gets a new look

Independent Spirit in Bath (see above) goes from strength to strength – and we are not just talking ABV here. Chris and Christian continue to source superb beers from around the UK – and the world – that have simply not cropped up on the radar before, so many in fact that it is impossible to keep up with them. We also managed to get to a terrific rum tasting evening there as well as a ‘meet the brewer’ session with Shane O’Beirne from Beerd. This was something of a revelation, for, although I was familiar with Shane’s keynote ‘new wave’ style brews using American, Australian and New Zealand hops, his Scottish 80 shilling and a mild – Mildy Cyrus – brewed in collaboration with the Bristol Beer Factory were superb examples of more traditional beer styles. My favourite of the seven beers of the evening, however, was Convict, a cheekily-monikered offering using Australian hops – mainly Galaxy, but with a sprinkling of Ella. This should be appearing in selected Bath Ales pubs and other outlets soon.                

Shane O'Beirne of Beerd and Chris Scullion of Independent Spirit
Shane O’Beirne of Beerd and Chris Scullion of Independent Spirit